Suicide Prevention

Suicide Prevention
It's everyone's business

July 16, 2019  By David Scott

 

Suicide Prevention: It’s Everyone’s Business

 

This may be something you don’t expect a business to say, but there are portions of our business for which we hope we never make another sale.

 

One type of call we never want to receive is for suicide cleanup. Unfortunately, those calls come far too often. Statistics from the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention paint a grim picture:

 

·        There are 129 Suicides Per Day

 

·        Suicide is the 10th Leading Cause of Death in the United States

 

Another alarming statistic comes from the Center for Disease Control:

 

·        The Suicide Rate has Increased 30% Since 2000  

 

While part of our business is helping families deal with the aftermath of this tragedy, we’d much rather that suicide prevention programs find a way to reverse the sad trends we’ve seen and that lives could be saved as a result.

 

The Front Lines of Suicide Prevention

 

Following a suicide, those left behind often feel guilty about not having done more to help the person who had been threatening to or showing signs that they were going to take their own life.

 

Guilt has no place at the table. Loved ones do their best with the information they have, but the sad reality is that if someone is truly determined to take their life, they will find a way to do it.

 

That being said, the front lines of suicide prevention are with those who interact with the person day in and day out. The person may not call a suicide hotline. They might not seek professional mental health care—but if they live in your home, work with you, attend classes with you, or see you at church, you have a chance to make a difference once you detect a potential problem.

 

Hera are some tips from Front Line Service, a community behavioral health organization, when dealing with a person you believe is in crisis:

 

·        Be Willing to Listen

 

·        Don’t Be Judgmental

 

·        Avoid Lecturing on How Precious Life Is (they don’t feel that way right now)

 

·        Don’t Make Promises Not to Share the Information

 

·        Offer Hope by Discussing Alternatives

 

·        Remove Firearms, Pills, and Other Methods of Suicide

 

Most importantly: If you think someone you know is thinking about suicide, call a suicide prevention hotline in your area for advice specific to your situation.

 

If you’re a child or teen who has a friend that has mentioned suicide, tell a school counselor, your parents, or another adult you can trust.

 

Don’t worry about whether or not you’re over reacting. If you’re wrong, that’s great, and no harm is done. If you’re right, your actions just might save a life.

 

Our hearts break as we watch families go through this type of tragic event. While we can put their homes back together, we know their lives and hearts will never be the same.

 

If you see something, say something. We’re all on the front lines of suicide prevention.

 

As trusted Tucson extreme cleaning specialists, we’re able to help people return their homes to normal after events such as a robbery, unattended death, and more.  We are available 24/7 365 days a year.  When you need us we are here within the Tucson Community, call us at 520-771-5960.

 

 

 

If you are in Arizona and need immediate help, call EMPACT:

 

480.784.1500 or 866.205.5229

 

Arizona teens can call Teen Lifeline:

 

602.248.TEEN (8336) or 800.248 TEEN

 

 

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